2.6 Percent Pay Raise for Troops Goes into Effect

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Washington Report

Guardsmen should see a little more money in their drill checks after an across-the-board pay raise took effect this month.

The 2.6 percent raise approved by Congress last year – which went into effect on Jan. 1 – will be included in the first checks this year, according to the Defense Finance Accounting Service.

The raise represents an increase of between $13 and $45 per typical drill weekend for National Guard officers and between $100 and $336 per month for officers serving on active duty.

Enlisted soldiers and airmen would receive an increase of between $6 and $28 per typical drill weekend or between $47 and $208 per month for active-duty service. And warrant officers would see an increase of between $18 and $34 per typical drill weekend or between $136 and $259 per month for active duty time.

The full Reserve Component Drill Pay Table is available at the DFAS website at www.dfas.mil.

Service members have received at least a 1 percent raise each year for more than a decade. The 2.6 percent raise approved last year is the highest since 2010, when Congress approved a 3.4 percent raise.

Military retirees, surviving spouses and those on disability will receive a 2.8 percent pay increase. Their pay increases are pegged to cost-of-living increases and do not require authorization by Congress.

Defense Department civilians had been in line for a 1.9 percent raise, but President Donald Trump ordered a pay freeze for government workers late last month.
 

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